At the market


One of the other big draws of the Pergamon is the Market Gate of Miletus. This was taken when the museum was still open, so those people milling around give a sense of the size of the gate - it's HUGE! Unfortunately, I couldn't even get the whole thing in my shot - the next time I'm there I will definitely bring my wide angle lens. 

All of the pieces I've shown you so far are the real deal - not reconstructions. Back in the early 1900's archeology and anthropology became very popular and the scientists (or hobbyists) found things at dig sites, they typically packed them up and brought them back to Europe for everyone to enjoy. I'm pretty sure none of this would fly in modern times, but the Pergamon is really special and if you're in Berlin it's a must-see. This is my take on "decay" for Rubbish Tuesday.

28 comments:

  1. Impressive It looks good.

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  2. And some would say that this needs to go back to where it was taken. I'm glad it's the main lure of Pergamon though!

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    1. I don't think they could really "give" these exhibits back now. Think of the expense just of dismantling these pieces and then transporting them. :S

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    2. My first thought was: this should be in Greece! But... I have to consider what you have stated. I always have mixed feelings when it comes to situations such as this one. In Egypt, for instance, it's heartbreaking looking at empty places knowing that what was originally there can only be seen in other countries.

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    3. I meant Turkey, not Greece, sorry...

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    4. No worries! I thought Pergamon was in Greece! But I have been wrong many times before... :)

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  3. It really was a different time when archeologists were allowed to take such ancient treasures away from there places of origin. This must have been very difficult to move and reconstruct.

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    1. Although I know it's frowned upon in today's times, I'm glad we have these exhibits here. In those days too, they "reconstructed" parts of the gate (and altar, etc) to make it whole. Today they would just leave it in the state it was found (after cleaning and restoration, of course).

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  4. impressive place, for sure!

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  5. Immense gate. I must tell my nephew and his wife who are in Frankfurt.

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    1. The museum is going to close soon for major renovations. Some of the smaller items will be on display at the nearby Bodemuseum. But obviously, the big things like this won't be able to be seen. Tell him to hurry! :)

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  6. That is one amazing piece of decay! Thank you for linking up.

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  7. I just love all those columns!

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  8. Huge!!! Love the old buildings. Our old is fairly new in Europe. LOL MB

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  9. Wow...impressive. I'd spend hours...no, days there I'm sure.

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  10. It is very beautiful. And at least it was carted off to Berlin and not destroyed. I'll certainly put it on my list of places to visit if I ever get to Berlin.

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  11. Wow - I hadn't heard of it before you started showing us your pics. Wonderful!

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  12. So beautiful and thank you for the information about it.

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  13. Wonderful photo and post! Thank you.

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  14. Fabulous!! Thanks for dropping by and visiting!

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  15. Wow, that is just immense - great photo!

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  16. Despite the loss from its original country, I am happy that many of us have been able to visit this remarkable museum.

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  17. I thought that was one of the most stunning exhibits. There is a similar theatre in Orange in France in its original location.

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