Capitulation room


This is the main draw of the German-Russian Museum - the room where WWII was officially ended on 8 May 1945 when German forces signed the unconditional surrender. In attendance were representatives for the Allied forces - Marshal Georgy Zhukov on behalf of the Soviet Union, Air Chief Marshal Arthur William Tedder for the United Kingdom, General Carl Spaatz for the United States and General Jean de Lattre de Tassigny for France. 


There is a copy of the document on display in the museum. It is said that Eisenhower found the idea of a "capitulation ceremony" distasteful and therefore sent General Carl Spaatz to be the witness for the United States.

PS: Happy Halloween! I wonder if we'll have any kiddies trick-or-treating tonight.

22 comments:

  1. low-key for such a huge event.

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  2. Not so amazing to read how the countries couldn't even agree on how to accept the surrender. Good grief!

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  3. What a huge piece of history that is! I never knew where it took place.

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  4. Understated for how much history took place there, but I like the tones of the floor and the door.

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    1. The room has not been changed since the signatures. All of the furniture, etc. is original.

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  5. It is a beautiful room. So much history there.

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  6. It is a pretty simple room, isn't it? I have mixed thoughts about the idea of a capitulation ceremony. After five years of carnage and huge loss of life on all sides, I can imagine the Allied forces wanting to bring the country that caused all of that to be brought to its knees. On the other hand, with peace attained, I can see the logic in not humiliating the people (as contrasted with the leaders) of the defeated country.

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  7. I love this room, just the way I like it. Neat and uncluttered. :)

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  8. No doubt it was not Eisenhower's idea, more like one of the Russians or French who wanted the Germans to feel more humiliation over the war

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  9. wow,
    what a moment, can you imagine ? a so important moment for humanity...
    have a nice week end, saluti

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  10. I now understand why the museum is here in this building. It is the place were the treaty was signed and of course at the end they had trouble to find an undamaged building near berlin.

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  11. I agree with Eisenhower, and I think Bill is right suggesting humiliation as the motive...

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  12. Like S.C. I now understand why this building is so important. I like the the room's understated look.

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  13. I can't remember ever hearing the word capitulation but I be a it meant right away. So this was the actual building where the formal ceremony took place. No wonder ithe museum is there.

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  14. Knew what it meant that should have said. IPAD, sorry!

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    1. I understood what you meant in the first comment. Ipad is a hassle for typing and commenting.

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  15. If this room was in darkness, it would be scary time, I bet.

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  16. I put the museum on my list for the next visit!

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  17. Lincoln and Grant insisted that representatives of the Confederacy be treated with dignity. Had Lincoln lived I suspect U.S. history would have been very different. Ending wars can set the tone for future peace, or not.

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